Sweater Tutorial Using The GIMP

August 16, 2008

This is a follow on from the Denim Jeans Tutorial. It follows the same basic theory on bump mapping and displacement used in my previous entry. If you read this and find I am skipping a few steps, I suggest trying the denim tutorial as well.

As with before, the final outcome will be up for sale in Afton’s ONE dollarbie shop , with a link back to this blog.

Now… let’s get cracking! :D

For this tutorial, I’m using the templates by Chip Midnight again, at 512 resolution.

Create a new layer, and fill it with a colour of your choice. I chose a nice deep red for mine. Rename this layer “Sweater Colour Base”.

** Before you say anything, “yeah, yeah, I know, I know…”, The dark red, could possibly show as TOO dark for some people to see well, but! You can make your sweater any colour you want. I just wanted a dark red one! :P **

Create another new layer, and fill it with a mid grey colour (I chose 909090).

Go to Filters >> Noise >> RBG noise…

We’re going to add a LOT of noise. Make sure Independent RGB is unchecked, and set the values to 0.50.

Now go to Filters >> Blur >> Motion Blur…

Blur Type is Linear, and we set the length to 50, and the angle to 90.

Duplicate the layer you just made.

Then go to Layer >> Transform >> Rotate 90 counter-clockwise.

Change the layer blend mode to Overlay, and merge it down to the underlying grey layer.

You should have something like a weave-ish looking texture.

Add a small amount of noise again, somewhere between 0.05-0.10 is enough.

Change the layer blend mode to overlay again, and merge down once more. So, while we made two new layers to create the texture, you should have them all merged down to the original “Sweater Colour Base” we firstly created.

You should have something that looks like this.

** Before we do anything to this layer, I am going to save a copy as a TGA. Just the texture, as it is, because I am going to use it to make a band on the lower templates, in order to make a longer sweater. I’ll get to that when I’ve finished the top though, lol. **

Now we’re going to figure out our neckline placement. To make this easier, you can bring one of Chips layers to the top. I’ve brought up the Shaded Grid layer, changed its blend mode to Overlay, and dropped the opacity down to 50%.

Create a new layer above this, and rename it “Neckline Shape”.

Using the template as a guide, grab your paintbrush tool and draw in a wide white line for your neckline. I say wide because I am attempting to make a knitted band for the edge.

Now we’re going to bump map this information to our base.

Select the “Sweater Colour Base” layer, and go to Filters >> Map >> Bump map…

From the drop down menu, select the layer you just made “Neckline Shape”.

These are the setting I used, but as always, feel free to play around with them.

You can choose to delete or hide the layer if you want to, but because I painted it in white, I’ve chosen to use it for some extra highlights. I’ve changed the blending mode to Soft light, and dropped the opacity to 10%.

Create a new layer and rename it “neckline ribbing”, this time we are adding a “ribbed” effect to the v-neck shape we just made.

Grab your paintbrush tool again, this time I’ve chosen Circle Fuzzy (07). Paint in some lines for where you want the rib to go.

Go back to the “Sweater Colour Base” layer, and we’re going to bump map the ribbing in.

Go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map... from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made “neckline ribbing”.

The only setting I changed from the last time, is I have checked “Invert”… it just looked better, lol.

As before, you can hide, delete keep this layer for extra shading/highlights this layer. I’ve inverted the colour (switched it to black by going to Colors >> Invert), changed the blend mode to Burn, and dropped to opacity to 10%.

Thats the neckline finished!

Next, we move on to the cuff, its pretty much the same as the neckline, so create a new layer and name it Cuff Shape.

We paint a big white block for how wide we want it.

Select the “Sweater Base Colour” layer. Then go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map… from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made “Cuff Shape”.

Keep the settings the same as before, so no screen shot, just deselect Invert for the solid white.

You can delete or keep it, I keep them for highlights or shading.

Next make a new layer for the ribbing of the cuffs, name it that. Grab your paintbrush tool and paint in some lines for ribbing.

Select the “Sweater Base Colour” layer. Then go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map... from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made “Cuff Ribbing”.

Keep the settings the same as before, but check Invert.

Delete or keep the layer. I inverted the colour and used it as shading.

* GRIN * Starting to look like a sweater yet?

Now to add some wrinkles! We’re still using the same principles as before. I /love/ how friendly bump mapping is in GIMP. Once you get used to it, its one of those steps you really can’t live without.

Create a new layer, and name it “Wrinkles”. Grab a fuzzy brush, and paint in some wrinkles on the front, back, and some on the arms as well. I smudged out the ends, so they tapered off a bit, and I applied a Gaussian Blur of 10.0.

Select the “Sweater Base Colour” layer. Then go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map… from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made “Wrinkles”.

These are my settings, but feel free to change them to your own if you wish.

With your base layer still selected, we’re also going to use the displace filter for the wrinkles.

Go to Filters >> Displace… Select your “Wrinkles” layer from the drop down menu for both X & Y, and we are going to negatively displace by -5.0 on both coordinates. This is a screen shot of what my filter looks like.

I’ve kept my wrinkles layer again, inverted the colour, swapped the blend mode to Burn, and dropped to opacity to 20%.

ALMOST finished! By now, you have a sweater that is definitely starting to look like it should. The texture has texture, something I find fairly lacking in SL. All the shading in the world will never be a replacement for good texturing, however, you do need shading to complete the look of things.

To do this, I’m using one of my “Fake Bake” back-up files. I’ll put up the greyscale image for you to save for your own use.

I place it on a new layer, changed the bend mode to multiply and dropped the opacity down to 50%.

All we have left to do for the top part, is mask out what we don’t want on our “Sweater Base Colour” layer. Remember to save your work as an XCF, so you can go back and fiddle with it later if you want. Then save it as a TGA.

We have finished with the top BUT we’re not finished. At the beginning of the tutorial, I saved the basic texture for later use on the lower template, so now we’re going to make a band for the sweater.

I’m using Chip’s lower templates again, at 512 resolution.

Open up the solid layer TGA we saved earlier, select all, copy, and paste it in to a new layer on the templates file. Name it “Sweater Solid Colour” as we did for the upper template.

The theory on this, is that it doesn’t /really/ have to be seamless, because all we are making is the ribbed band for the bottom. We’re using the same method as we did for the neckline and cuffs.

On a new layer named “Band Shape”, create a wide band using your paintbrush tool in white.

Select the “Sweater Solid Colour” layer, and go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map… from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made, “Band Shape”.

These are my settings, by now, you should be used to the filter enough to just play around, but just in case, I’ll keep putting up screenshots.

I kept the layer, changed the blend mode to overlay, and dropped opacity to 10%.

Create another new layer and name it “Band Ribbing”. You guessed it! Now we’re making the ribbed part. So grab your paintbrush again, and paint in some lines across the band.

Select the “Sweater Solid Colour” layer, and go to Filters >> Map >> Bump Map… from the drop down menu, select the layer you just made, “Band Ribbing”.

The only part I changed in the settings was to check “Invert”, so no screen shot this time.

I’ve kept the layer again, inverted the colour (by going to Color >> Invert), switched the blend mode to burn, and dropped the opacity to 20%.

ALMOST done again. I’ve used the “Lower Fake Bake” (which can be found on the previous tutorial for denim jeans). I’ve changed the layer blend mode to multiply, and dropped the opacity to 50% to match the settings I had for the upper.

All that we have left to do, is mask out what we don’t want, save the XCF, then save it as a TGA, and upload them both to SL.

Taaa daaaaa! Final Sweater, up for sale in Afton’s ONE shop, click the poster for an Slurl. In-world, you can buy the finished sweater for 1L, or click the poster for a link back to this site. ENJOY!

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12 Responses to “Sweater Tutorial Using The GIMP”

  1. Simon said

    Nice tutorial, the noise + motion blur works great for cloth-like texture!

    Thank you

  2. Ceres Eilde said

    This is a great tutorial for wrinkle effects. Thank you!

  3. […] Sweater Tutorial Denim Jeans Tutorial Strapless […]

  4. […] similar both for Photoshop and The GIMP. A significant change in that process can be observed on this 2008 tutorial on Random Ramblings Tips & Tricks on how to create a sweater using The GIMP. In this case, one uses the Bump Map filter to “apply” the wrinkles to the main layer […]

  5. Hi Ms. Claire

    I love your tutorial, it really help me alot! I just want to know how to do that “Fake Bake”. I know there are instruction how to make it on PS, but can you modify it on GIMP? I only have GIMP, and thats the software I can use.

    • claireharford said

      Take a look at one of my other entries. There is a work-around for getting Photoshop filters up and running in GIMP. It works but it has bugs. Sometimes you see the filters preview window… and sometimes you don’t. But! It is better than nothing at all. How to: Photoshop Filters in The GIMP

  6. ckished23@yahoo.com said

    Hi ms claire…What software do you use in creating that sweater..?’cause mine here is adobe photoshop cs3 and they are different…

    • claireharford said

      The sweater tutorial and jeans tutorial were both written for GIMP and as far as I know there is no easy way to do the same thing in Photoshop. The good news is- GIMP is free! And it’s always fun learning a new program. :)

  7. Anousha said

    Heya Claire,

    thank you for this awesome tutorial. I just started designing clothes two days and stuff like this really helps me out! I have a question though: is there a way to attach the lower part to the upperpart in SL? Or do they stay two seperate pieces of clothing? Thank you:)

    Anousha

    • claireharford said

      You will still need to upload the two individual textures but if you apply them to a jacket it will be a single item of clothing. The jacket layer has two slots, one for upper and one for lower. :) Hope that helps.

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